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IRS Sex workers taxes

Tax Court Approves Vehicle Deductions for Side Gig

Do you client have a “side hustle” going on in addition to their full-time job? If you qualify, you may deduct certain expenses incurred by the self-employed business, including costs attributable to your vehicle.

The recent Tax Court case Gonzalez, TC Summary Opinion 2022-13, 7/18/22 found that it is indeed OK to deduct vehicle expenses related to a side-gig, as long as the filer follows strict rules.

Generally, expenses relating to use of a car, van, pickup or panel truck used for business are deductible. For example, if they drive their own passenger car to visit clients or customers, they may write off the portion of their vehicle’s costs that is attributable to business use, subject to some special limits. If they use their car 80 percent for business, they can deduct 80 percent of the costs.

The vehicle expenses are deductible under one of two methods:

1. Standard mileage rate: This is a flat rate adjusted by the IRS at least annually. For 2022, the deduction is 58.5 cents per business mile for the first half of the year and 62.5 cents for the second half. Also, they can add in business-related parking fees and tolls.

2. Actual expenses: Alternatively, they can deduct actual expenses based on the percentage of business use. This includes gas, oil, insurance, repairs, licenses, tires, etc., plus a generous depreciation allowance.

The actual expense method often provides a bigger deduction than the standard mileage rate. However, they must keep receipts, invoices and other documentation to show costs and establish the identity of the vehicle for which the expenses were incurred. For depreciation purposes, they must show the original cost of the vehicle and any improvements, as well as the date it was placed in service.

The IRS has issued detailed regulations covering the substantiation of vehicle expenses under the actual expense method. The best way to secure a deduction is to keep a contemporaneous log or comparable record of expenses and business use.

Facts of the new case: The taxpayer, a resident of California, had a full-time job at Stanford University. After moving to Palo Alto, she started a small clothing design business in Los Angeles.

During the year at issue, the taxpayer traveled to a patternmaker workshop in Los Angeles and Inglewood in southern California approximately every other weekend. She made the 800-mile round-trip by car. Although the taxpayer stayed with family and friends in the area during these trips, the primary purpose of the travel was business-related.

At trial, the taxpayer submitted a mileage log detailing the dates traveled, distances traveled and the purpose of each trip. She also submitted vehicle service receipts corroborating the miles driven. The taxpayer testified credibly as to the business nature of her trips.

End of the road: The Tax Court determined that the taxpayer has satisfied her burden of proof for substantiating vehicle expenses. Accordingly, it approved a deduction of more than $12,000 for vehicle expenses for the year at issue.

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IRS Sex workers taxes

Extension filers: IRS.gov & SWTaxes is the source for summertime tax help; agency encourages people to file soon

WASHINGTON — With millions of people still waiting to file their tax returns, the IRS reminds them to file as soon as possible and take advantage of special tools available on IRS.gov that can help them file.
Summer may be a busy time for many, but it’s a great time to start tax planning – whether you still need to file a 2021 tax return or start planning for next year’s tax season. IRS.gov is the fastest and most convenient way to get tax-related information and help. The online tools are available any time, so taxpayers can use them at their convenience.
Here are some important reasons for taxpayers to visit IRS.gov this summer.
Get tax information 24/7
Taxpayers can use IRS.gov to:
• View the filing page to get information on most federal income tax topics.
• Access the Interactive Tax Assistant tool for answers to many tax law questions.
• Sign into their individual IRS online account to view their balance an tax records, manage communication preferences, make payments and more.
• Find the most up-to-date information about their tax refunds using the Where’s My Refund? tool. Taxpayers can check the status of their refund 24 hours after the IRS acknowledges receipt of an e-filed return.
Taxpayers can also download the official IRS mobile app, IRS2Go, to check their refund status, make payments, find free tax preparation assistance, sign up for helpful tax tips and more.
Adjust withholding now to avoid tax surprises next year
Summer is a great time for taxpayers to check their withholding to avoid a tax surprise next filing season. Life events like marriage, divorce, having a child or a change in income can affect taxes.
The IRS Tax Withholding Estimator on IRS.gov helps employees assess their income tax, credits, adjustments and deductions, and determine whether they need to change their withholding. If a change is recommended, the estimator will provide instructions to update their withholding with their employer either online or by submitting a new Form W-4, Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate.
File electronically
Taxpayers who requested an extension to Oct. 17 or missed the April 18 deadline can still prepare and e-file returns. The IRS accepts electronically filed returns 24/7. There’s no reason to wait until Oct. 17 if filers have all the information and documentation they need to file an accurate return today. They can get their refund faster by choosing direct deposit. Contact us today to file your return.

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Sex workers

IRS reminds taxpayers who haven’t filed yet to choose their tax preparer wisely

Taxpayers who have not yet filed their 2021 tax return may file electronically when they are ready rather than wait until the October 17, 2022, extension deadline. If they are considering hiring a tax preparer, it’s important to choose wisely. Taxpayers are responsible for all the information on their tax return, no matter who prepares it for them or when it’s filed.

There are different kinds of tax return preparers, and a taxpayer’s needs will determine which kind of preparer is best for them.

Here are some things taxpayers should do when choosing a tax return preparer
• Check the IRS Directory of Federal Tax Return Preparers. This searchable and sortable public directory helps taxpayers find a tax return preparer with specific qualifications.
• Check the preparer’s history with the Better Business Bureau. Taxpayers should check for any disciplinary actions for credentialed tax return preparers. For CPAs, check with the State Board of Accountancy. For attorneys, check with the State Bar Association. For enrolled agents, verify the agent’s status on IRS.gov.
• Ask about fees. Taxpayers should avoid tax return preparers who base their fees on a percentage of the refund or who offer to deposit all or part of the refund into their own financial accounts. They should be wary of tax return preparers who claim they can get larger refunds than their competitors.
• Ask if the preparer plans to use IRS e-file. Taxpayers should make sure their preparer offers IRS e-file. The IRS issues most refunds in fewer than 21 days for taxpayers who file electronically and choose direct deposit.
• Make sure the preparer is available. Taxpayers should consider whether the tax return preparer will be around after the filing deadline has passed. Taxpayers should do this because they might need the preparer to answer questions about the preparation of the tax return. Avoid fly-by-night preparers.
• Ensure the preparer signs and includes their preparer tax identification number. All aid tax return preparers must have a PTIN to prepare tax returns. Preparers must sign returns and include their PTIN.
• Understand the preparer’s credentials. Enrolled agents, CPAs, and attorneys have unlimited practice rights and can represent taxpayers on any tax matter before the IRS. Tax return preparers who participate in the IRS Annual Filing Season Program have limited practice rights and may only represent taxpayers whose returns they prepared and signed, and only for exams and for customer service and Taxpayer Advocate Service inquiries.

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Top 4 things to remember when filing income tax returns in 2022

WASHINGTON — With filing season beginning January 24, the Internal Revenue Service reminded taxpayers about several key items to keep in mind when filing their federal income tax returns this year.
Given the unprecedented circumstances around the pandemic and unique challenges for this tax season, the IRS offers a 4-point checklist that can help many people speed tax return processing and refund delivery while avoiding delays.
1. File an accurate return and use e-file and direct deposit to avoid delays. Taxpayers should electronically file and choose direct deposit as soon as they have everything they need to file an accurate return. Taxpayers have many choices, including using a trusted tax professional. For those using e-file, the software helps individuals avoid mistakes by doing the math. It guides people through each section of their tax return using a question-and-answer format.
2. For an accurate return, collect all documents before preparing a tax return; make sure stimulus payment and advance Child Tax Credit information is accurate. In addition to collecting W-2s, Form 1099s and other income-related statements, it is important people have their advance Child Tax Credit and Economic Impact Payment information on hand when filing.
Advance CTC letter 6419: In late December 2021, and continuing into January, the IRS started sending letters to people who received advance CTC payments. The letter says, “2021 Total Advance Child Tax Credit (AdvCTC) Payments” near the top and, “Letter 6419” on the bottom righthand side of the page. Here’s what people need to know:
• The letter contains important information that can help ensure the tax return is accurate.
• People who received advance CTC payments can also check the amount of the payments they received by using the CTC Update Portal available on IRS.gov.
• Eligible taxpayers who received advance Child Tax Credit payments should file a 2021 tax return to receive the second half of the credit. Eligible taxpayers who did not receive advance Child Tax Credit payments can claim the full credit by filing a tax return.
Third Economic Impact Payment letter 6475: In late January 2022, the IRS will begin issuing letters to people who received a third payment in late January 2021. The letter says, “Your Third Economic Impact Payment” near the top and, “Letter 6475” on the bottom righthand side of the page. Here’s what people need to know:
• Most eligible people already received their stimulus payments. This letter will help individuals determine if they are eligible to claim the Recovery Rebate Credit (RRC) for missing stimulus payments.
• People who are eligible for RRC must file a 2021 tax return to claim their remaining stimulus amount.
• People can also use IRS online account to view their Economic Impact Payment amounts.
Both letters – 6419 and 6475 – include important information that can help people file an accurate 2021 tax return. If a return includes errors or is incomplete, it may require further review while the IRS corrects the error, which may slow the tax refund. Using this information when preparing a tax return electronically can reduce errors and avoid delays in processing.
3. Avoid lengthy phone delays; use online resources before calling the IRS. Phone demand on IRS assistance lines remains at record highs. To avoid lengthy delays, the IRS urges people to use IRS.gov to get answers to tax questions, check a refund status or pay taxes. There’s no wait time or appointment needed — online tools and resources are available 24 hours a day.
Additionally, the IRS has several ways for taxpayers to stay up to date on important tax information:
• Follow the IRS’ official social media accounts and email subscription lists to stay current on the latest tax topics and alerts.
• Download the IRS2Go mobile app, watch IRS YouTube videos, or follow the IRS on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Instagram for the latest updates on tax changes, scam alerts, initiatives, products and services.
• Taxpayers can also get information in their preferred language. The IRS translates tax resources into several languages and currently has basic tax information in 20 languages. People can also file Schedule LEP, Request for Change in Language Preference, to receive written communications from the IRS in their preferred language.
4. Waiting on a 2020 tax return to be processed? Special tip to help with e-filing a 2021 tax return: In order to validate and successfully submit an electronically filed tax return to the IRS, taxpayers need their Adjusted Gross Income, or AGI, from their most recent tax return. For those waiting on their 2020 tax return to be processed, here’s a special tip to ensure the tax return is accepted by the IRS for processing. Make sure to enter $0 (zero dollars) for last year’s AGI on the 2021 tax return. For those who used a Non-Filer tool in 2021 to register for an advance Child Tax Credit or third Economic Impact Payment in 2021, they should enter $1 as their prior year AGI. Everyone else should enter their prior year’s AGI from last year’s return. Remember, if using the same tax preparation software as last year, this field will auto-populate.

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IRS Sex workers taxes

Taxpayers must report gig economy earnings when filing taxes

Whether it’s a full-time job or just a side hustle, taxpayers must report gig economy earnings on their tax return. Understanding how gig work can affect taxes may sound complicated but, it doesn’t have to be. The IRS offers several resources to help gig economy taxpayers properly fulfill their tax responsibilities.
Here are some things gig workers should keep in mind.
Gig work is taxable:
• Earnings from gig economy work is taxable, regardless of whether an individual receives information returns. The reporting requirement for issuance of Form 1099-K changed for payments received in 2022 to totals exceeding $600, regardless of the total number of transactions. This means some gig workers will now receive an information return. This is true even if the work is full-time, part-time or if an individual is paid in cash.
• Gig workers may also be required to make quarterly estimated income tax payments and pay their share of Social Security and Medicare taxes.
Check worker classification:
• While providing gig economy services, it is important that the taxpayer is correctly classified.
• This means the business, or the platform, must determine whether the individual providing the services is an employee or independent contractor.
• Taxpayers can use the worker classification page on IRS.gov to see how they are classified.
• Independent contractors may be able to deduct business expenses, depending on tax limits and rules. It is important for taxpayers to keep records of their business expenses.
Pay the right amount of taxes throughout the year:
• An employer typically withholds income taxes from their employees’ pay to help cover income taxes their employees owe.
• Gig economy workers who are not considered employees have two ways to cover their income taxes:
o Submit a new From W-4 to their employer to have more income taxes withheld from their paycheck, if they have another job as an employee.
o Make quarterly estimated tax payments to help pay their income taxes throughout the year, including self-employment tax.
The Gig Economy Tax Center on IRS.gov answers questions and helps gig economy taxpayers understand their tax responsibilities.

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IRS Sex workers taxes

Get ready for taxes: Here’s what’s new and what to consider when filing in 2022

The IRS encourages taxpayers to get informed about topics related to filing their federal tax returns in 2022. These topics include special steps related to charitable contributions, economic impact payments and advance child tax credit payments. Taxpayers can visit IRS.gov/getready for online tools, publications and other helpful resources for the filing season.
Here are some key items for taxpayers to know before they file next year.
Changes to the charitable contribution deduction
Taxpayers who don’t itemize deductions may qualify to take a deduction of up to $600 for married taxpayers filing joint returns and up to $300 for all other filers for cash contributions made in 2021 to qualifying organizations.
Check on advance child tax credit payments
Families who received advance payments will need to compare the advance child tax credit payments that they received in 2021 with the amount of the child tax credit that they can properly claim on their 2021 tax return.
• Taxpayers who received less than the amount for which they’re eligible will claim a credit for the remaining amount of child tax credit on their 2021 tax return.
• Eligible families who did not get monthly advance payments in 2021 can still get a lump-sum payment by claiming the child tax credit when they file a 2021 federal income tax return next year. This includes families who don’t normally need to file a return.
In January 2022, the IRS will send Letter 6419 with the total amount of advance child tax credit payments taxpayers received in 2021. People should keep this and any other IRS letters about advance child tax credit payments with their tax records. Individuals can also create or log in to IRS.gov online account to securely access their child tax credit payment amounts.
Economic impact payments and claiming the recovery rebate credit
Individuals who didn’t qualify for the third economic impact payment or did not receive the full amount may be eligible for the recovery rebate credit based on their 2021 tax information. They’ll need to file a 2021 tax return, even if they don’t usually file, to claim the credit.
Individuals will need the amount of their third economic impact payment and any plus-up payments received to calculate their correct 2021 recovery rebate credit amount when they file their tax return.
In early 2022, the IRS will send Letter 6475 that contains the total amount of the third economic impact payment and any plus-up payments received. People should keep this and any other IRS letters about their stimulus payments with other tax records. Individuals can also create or log in to IRS.gov online account to securely access their economic impact payment amounts.
More information:
Reconciling Your Advance Child Tax Credit Payments on Your 2021 Tax Return

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Sex workers

What taxpayers can do now to get ready to file taxes in 2022

There are steps people, including those who received stimulus payments or advance child tax credit payments, can take now to make sure their tax filing experience goes smoothly in 2022. They can start by visiting the Get Ready page on IRS.gov. Here are some other things they should do to prepare to file their tax return.
Gather and organize tax records
Organized tax records make preparing a complete and accurate tax return easier. They help avoid errors that lead to processing delays that slow refunds. Having all needed documents on hand before taxpayers prepare their return helps them file it completely and accurately. This includes:
• Forms W-2 from employers
• Forms 1099 from banks, issuing agencies and other payers including unemployment compensation, dividends, distributions from a pension, annuity or retirement plan
• Form 1099-K, 1099-MISC, W-2 or other income statement for workers in the gig economy
• Form 1099-INT for interest received
• Other income documents and records of virtual currency transactions
Taxpayers should also gather any documents from these types of earnings. People should keep copies of tax returns and all supporting documents for at least three years.
Income documents can help taxpayers determine if they’re eligible for deductions or credits. People who need to reconcile their advance payments of the child tax credit and premium tax credit will need their related 2021 information. Those who did not receive their full third Economic Impact Payments will need their third payment amounts to figure and claim the 2021 recovery rebate credit.
Taxpayers should also keep end of year documents including:
• Letter 6419, 2021 Total Advance Child Tax Credit Payments, to reconcile advance child tax credit payments
• Letter 6475, Your 2021 Economic Impact Payment, to determine eligibility to claim the recovery rebate credit
• Form 1095-A, Health Insurance Marketplace Statement, to reconcile advance premium tax credits for Marketplace coverage
Confirm mailing and email addresses and report name changes
To make sure forms make it to the them on time, taxpayers should confirm now that each employer, bank and other payer has their current mailing address or email address. People can report address changes by completing Form 8822, Change of Address and sending it to the IRS. Taxpayers should also notify the postal service to forward their mail by going online at USPS.com or their local post office. They should also notify the Social Security Administration of a legal name change.
View account information online
Individuals who have not set up an Online Account yet should do so soon. People who have already set up an Online Account should make sure they can still log in successfully. Taxpayers can use Online Account to securely access the latest available information about their federal tax account.
Review proper tax withholding and make adjustments if needed
Taxpayers may want to consider adjusting their withholding if they owed taxes or received a large refund in 2021. Changing withholding can help avoid a tax bill or let individuals keep more money each payday. Life changes – getting married or divorced, welcoming a child or taking on a second job – may also be reasons to change withholding. Taxpayers might think about completing a new Form W-4, Employee’s Withholding Certificate, each year and when personal or financial situations change.
People also need to consider estimated tax payments. Individuals who receive a substantial amount of non-wage income like self-employment income, investment income, taxable Social Security benefits and in some instances, pension and annuity income should make quarterly estimated tax payments. The last payment for 2021 is due on Jan. 18, 2022.

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Sex workers

Some important things all taxpayers should do before the tax year ends

The IRS reminds taxpayers there are things they should do before the current tax year ends on Dec.31.
Donate to charity
Taxpayers may be able to deduct donations to tax-exempt organizations on their tax return. As people are deciding where to make their donations, the IRS has a tool that may help. Tax Exempt Organization Search on IRS.gov allows users to search for charities. It provides information about an organization’s federal tax status and filings.
The law now permits taxpayers to claim a limited deduction on their 2021 federal income tax returns for cash contributions they made to certain qualifying charitable organizations even if they don’t itemize their deductions. Taxpayers, including married individuals filing separate returns, can claim a deduction of up to $300 for cash contributions to qualifying charities during 2021. The maximum deduction is $600 for married individuals filing joint returns.
Most cash donations made to charity qualify for the deduction. However, there are some exceptions. Cash contributions include those made by check, credit card or debit card as well as unreimbursed out-of-pocket expenses in connection with volunteer services to a qualifying charitable organization.
Check Individual Taxpayer Identification Number
An ITIN only needs to be renewed if it has expired and is needed on a U.S. federal tax return.
If an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number was not included on a U.S. federal tax return at least once for tax years 2018, 2019 and 2020, the ITIN will expire on Dec. 31, 2021.
As a reminder, ITINs with middle digits 70 through 88 have expired. In addition, ITINs with middle digits 90 through 99, if assigned before 2013, have expired. Individuals who previously submitted a renewal application that was approved, do not need to renew again.
Find information about retirement plans
IRS.gov has end-of-year tax information about retirement plans. This includes resources for individuals about retirement planning, contributions and withdrawals.
Contribute salary deferral
Taxpayers can make a salary deferral to a retirement plan. This helps maximize the tax credit available for eligible contributions. Taxpayers should make sure their total salary deferral contributions do not exceed the
$19,500 limit for 2021.
Get banked and set up direct deposit
Direct deposit gives taxpayers access to their refund faster than a paper check. Those without a bank account can learn how to open an account at an FDIC-Insured bank or through the National Credit Union Locator Tool.
Veterans should see the Veterans Benefits Banking Program for access to financial services at participating banks.
Connect with the IRS
Taxpayers can use social media to get the latest tax and filing tips from the IRS. The IRS shares information on things like tax changes, scam alerts, initiatives, tax products and taxpayer services. These social media tools are available in different languages, including English, Spanish and American Sign Language.
Think about tax refunds
Taxpayers should be careful not to expect getting a refund by a certain date. This is especially true for those who plan to use their refund to make major purchases or pay bills. Just as each tax return is unique to the individual, so is each taxpayer’s refund. Taxpayers can take steps now to Get Ready to file their federal tax return in 2022.

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IRS Sex workers taxes

Understanding the tax responsibilities that come with starting a business

If you are sex worker full time it may benefit you to form an LLC or an S-Corporation for tax purposes. If you have questions or need help feel free to ask us.

Small business owners have a variety of tax responsibilities. The IRS knows that understanding and meeting tax obligations is vital to the success of all businesses, especially a new one. IRS.gov has the resources and information to help people through the process of starting a new business.
Here are some tips for new entrepreneurs:
Choose a business structure.
The form of business determines which income tax return a business taxpayer needs to file. The most common business structures are:
• Sole proprietorship: An unincorporated business owned by an individual. There’s no distinction between the taxpayer and their business.
• Partnership: An unincorporated business with ownership shared between two or more people.
• Corporation: Also known as a C corporation. It’s a separate entity owned by shareholders.
• S Corporation: A corporation that elects to pass corporate income, losses, deductions and credits through to the shareholders.
• Limited Liability Company: A business structure allowed by state statute.
Choose a tax year.
A tax year is an annual accounting period for keeping records and reporting income and expenses. A new business owner must choose either:
• Calendar year: 12 consecutive months beginning January 1 and ending December 31.
• Fiscal year: 12 consecutive months ending on the last day of any month except December.
Apply for an employer identification number.
An EIN is also called a federal tax identification number. It’s used to identify a business. Most businesses need one of these numbers. It’s important for a business with an EIN to keep the business mailing address, location and responsible party up to date. IRS regulations require EIN holders to report changes in the responsible party within 60 days. They do this by completing Form 8822-B, Change of Address or Responsible Party and mailing it to the address on the form.
Have all employees complete these forms:
• Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
• Form W-4 Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate
Pay business taxes.
The form of business determines what taxes must be paid and how to pay them.

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Sex workers

What taxpayers need to know about making 2021 estimated tax payments

Small business owners, self-employed people, and some wage earners should look into whether they should make estimated tax payments this year. Doing so can help them avoid an unexpected tax bill and possibly a penalty when they file next year.
Taxpayers who earn a paycheck usually have their employer withhold tax from their checks. This helps cover taxes the employee owes. On the other hand, some taxpayers earn income not subject to withholding. For small business owners and self-employed people, that usually means making quarterly estimated tax payments.

Here are some details about estimated tax payments:
• Generally, taxpayers need to make estimated tax payments if they expect to owe $1,000 or more when they file their 2021 tax return, after adjusting for any withholding.
• The IRS urges anyone in this situation to check their withholding using the Tax Withholding Estimator on IRS.gov. If the estimator suggests a change, the taxpayer can submit a new Form W-4 to their employer.
• Aside from business owners and self-employed individuals, people who need to make estimated payments also include sole proprietors, partners and S corporation shareholders. It also often includes people involved in the sharing economy.
• Corporations generally must make these payments if they expect to owe $500 or more on their 2021 tax return.
• Aside from income tax, taxpayers can pay other taxes through estimated tax payments. This includes self-employment tax and the alternative minimum tax.
• The final two deadlines for paying 2021 estimated payments are September 15, 2019 and January 15, 2022.
• Taxpayers can check out these forms for details on how to figure their payments:
o Form 1040-ES, Estimated Tax for Individuals
o Form 1120-W, Estimated Tax for Corporations
• Taxpayers can visit IRS.gov to find options for paying estimated taxes. These include:
o Direct Pay from a bank account.
o Paying by credit or debit card or the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System.
o Mailing a check or money order to the IRS.
o Paying cash at a retail partner.
• Anyone who pays too little tax through withholding, estimated tax payments, or a combination of the two may owe a penalty. In some cases, the penalty may apply if their estimated tax payments are late. The penalty may apply even if the taxpayer is due a refund.

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