Categories
IRS Sex workers taxes

Extension filers: IRS.gov & SWTaxes is the source for summertime tax help; agency encourages people to file soon

WASHINGTON — With millions of people still waiting to file their tax returns, the IRS reminds them to file as soon as possible and take advantage of special tools available on IRS.gov that can help them file.
Summer may be a busy time for many, but it’s a great time to start tax planning – whether you still need to file a 2021 tax return or start planning for next year’s tax season. IRS.gov is the fastest and most convenient way to get tax-related information and help. The online tools are available any time, so taxpayers can use them at their convenience.
Here are some important reasons for taxpayers to visit IRS.gov this summer.
Get tax information 24/7
Taxpayers can use IRS.gov to:
• View the filing page to get information on most federal income tax topics.
• Access the Interactive Tax Assistant tool for answers to many tax law questions.
• Sign into their individual IRS online account to view their balance an tax records, manage communication preferences, make payments and more.
• Find the most up-to-date information about their tax refunds using the Where’s My Refund? tool. Taxpayers can check the status of their refund 24 hours after the IRS acknowledges receipt of an e-filed return.
Taxpayers can also download the official IRS mobile app, IRS2Go, to check their refund status, make payments, find free tax preparation assistance, sign up for helpful tax tips and more.
Adjust withholding now to avoid tax surprises next year
Summer is a great time for taxpayers to check their withholding to avoid a tax surprise next filing season. Life events like marriage, divorce, having a child or a change in income can affect taxes.
The IRS Tax Withholding Estimator on IRS.gov helps employees assess their income tax, credits, adjustments and deductions, and determine whether they need to change their withholding. If a change is recommended, the estimator will provide instructions to update their withholding with their employer either online or by submitting a new Form W-4, Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate.
File electronically
Taxpayers who requested an extension to Oct. 17 or missed the April 18 deadline can still prepare and e-file returns. The IRS accepts electronically filed returns 24/7. There’s no reason to wait until Oct. 17 if filers have all the information and documentation they need to file an accurate return today. They can get their refund faster by choosing direct deposit. Contact us today to file your return.

Categories
IRS Sex workers taxes

IRS urges taxpayers to gather tax documents now for smooth filing later

WASHINGTON —The Internal Revenue Service is reminding taxpayers that organizing tax records is an important first step for getting ready to prepare and file their 2020 tax return.
Taxpayers should keep all necessary records, such as W-2s, 1099s, receipts, canceled checks and other documents that support an item of income, or a deduction or credit, appearing on their tax return.
Taxpayers should develop a system that keeps all their important information together, which could include a software program for electronic records or a file cabinet for paper documents in labeled folders. Having records readily at hand makes preparing a tax return easier.
To avoid refund delays, taxpayers should be sure to gather all year-end income documents so they can file a complete and accurate 2020 tax return.
Most taxpayers will receive income documents near the end of January including:
• Forms W-2, Wage and Tax Statement
• Form 1099-MISC, Miscellaneous Income
• Form 1099-INT, Interest Income
• Form 1099-NEC, Nonemployee Compensation
• Form 1099-G, Certain Government Payments; like unemployment compensation or state tax refund
• Form 1095-A, Health Insurance Marketplace Statements
View IRS account online
Taxpayers can view their online account allowing them to access the latest information available about their federal tax account and most recently filed tax return through a secure and convenient tool on IRS.gov. This can help taxpayers if they need information from last year’s return.
Additionally, in the coming weeks, individuals with an account on IRS.gov/account will be able to view the amounts of the Economic Impact Payments they received as well as the latest information available about their federal tax account. Eligible individuals who did not receive the full amounts of both Economic Impact Payments may claim the Recovery Rebate Credit on their 2020 federal tax return. In order to claim the full amount of the Recovery Rebate Credit, taxpayers will need to know the amount of the Economic Impact Payments received.
Visit Secure Access: How to Register for Certain Online Self-Help Tools for more information about how to create an account or how to reset the username or password.
Remember unemployment compensation is taxable
Millions of Americans received unemployment compensation in 2020, many of them for the first time. This compensation is taxable and must be included as gross income on their tax return.
Taxpayers can expect to receive a Form 1099-G showing their unemployment income. Taxpayers can elect to have federal taxes withheld from their unemployment benefits or make estimated tax payments, but many do not take these options. In that case, taxes on those benefits will be paid when the 2020 tax return is filed. Therefore, taxpayers who did not have tax withheld from their payments may see a smaller refund than expected or even have a tax bill.
Individuals who receive a Form 1099-G for unemployment compensation they did not receive should contact their state tax agency and request a corrected Form 1099-G. States should not issue Forms 1099-Gs to taxpayers they know to be victims of identity theft involving unemployment compensation.
Taxpayers who are victims of identity theft involving unemployment compensation should not file an identity theft affidavit with the IRS.
Individuals can find more details on taxable unemployment compensation in Tax Topic 418, Unemployment Compensation, or in Publication 525, Taxable and Nontaxable Income, on IRS.gov.
Taxpayers can use 2019 income for Earned Income Tax Credit
For taxpayers with income less than $56,844 in 2020, they may be eligible to claim the Earned Income Tax Credit. The EITC Assistant, available in English and Spanish, can help determine who is eligible. The EITC is as much as $6,660 for a family with children or up to $538 for taxpayers who do not have a qualifying child.
And this tax season, there’s a new rule that can help people impacted by a job loss or change in income in 2020. Under the COVID-related Tax Relief Act of 2020, taxpayers may elect to use their 2019 earned income to figure the credit if their 2019 earned income is more than their 2020 earned income. The same is true for the Additional Child Tax Credit. For details, see the instructions for Form 1040 or Publication 596, Earned Income Credit.
Electronic Filing makes filing easy
The best way to file a complete and accurate return is to file electronically and there are several options for doing this – some at no cost. Visit irs.gov/filing for more details about IRS Free File, Free File Fillable Forms, Free tax preparation sites or by finding a trusted tax professional. Free File is a great option for people who are only filing a tax return to claim the Recovery Rebate Credit, either because they didn’t receive an Economic Impact Payment or did not receive the full amount.

Categories
IRS Sex workers taxes

Five Reasons Sex Workers File Their Damn Taxes

1) Tax returns are the only proof of income you have if you’re self-employed and paid mostly, if not entirely, in cash.

2) It’s far better for the IRS to have your numbers to start with than to let them come up with their own.

3) If you get caught after not paying taxes for a number of years and get hit with a five-figure bill, it really sucks.

4) You become another person contradicting the stereotype of sex workers as tax cheats who don’t contribute to society.

5) It makes you (even more) morally superior to GE.

Things you need to file if you are an independent contractor stripper/model/performer/camgirl, an escort, sensual touch provider, etc:

Form 1040
Schedule C for income from a business (you are a business)
Form 8829 for home office deduction (you have a computer in your home where you’re doing business, yes?)
Your receipts for work-related supplies, travel, and other expenses
Records of your income

Even if you lack accurate records, give it your best shot and file. Even if you can’t pay right now, file. Even if what you do is illegal, file (you don’t have to write down what you do. We are all “entertainers”). Read this piece over at the Awl for some good reasons why you should file no matter what. It’s so, so much better to have YOUR realistic numbers than to have the IRS say, “Hey, we have this 1099 from your club, where you sold $1500 in VIP rooms, so we’re assuming that was a normal night for you, so we’re calculating your tax debt based on that,” or “Well, we saw on this 20/20 special about escorts that $2000/hour is a rate people pay in New York, so let’s start there.”

I don’t care if you’re gonna fudge it! Don’t tell me about it. Don’t tell anyone about it, for that matter. I’m not telling you to file because I think we owe it to the country or because I’m a bleeding-heart liberal or because I think the Tea Party is supremely misguided because they aren’t storming the gates of GE and Bank of America to demand they bear their burden of the tax load. I’m telling you to do this because it COVERS YOUR PRETTY PROFESSIONALLY SEXY ASS. Having personally fucked up with taxes before and knowing several dancers and escorts who’ve been in deep shit with the revenuers, I speak from experience when I say it’s to your advantage to stay on top of your taxes.

%d bloggers like this: